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01

Sep

smithsonianlibraries:

This is Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon. She died on September 1, 1914 in the Cincinnati Zoo. Shortly thereafter, her body was packed in ice and sent by railroad to Washington, DC, to become a part of the National Museum of Natural History’s collection as a lasting legacy of the harm that can be done to the natural world by humans. Just decades prior, the Passenger Pigeon was the most abundant bird in North America. The disappearance of the species helped ignite the modern conservation movement.
For the Centennial of her death, Martha was recently brought out for display and is currently on view in the exhibition Once There Were Billions, Vanished Birds of North America. Sponsored by the Smithsonian Libraries in partnership with the National Museum of Natural History and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, the exhibition tells the story of the last Passenger Pigeon, a member of a species that once numbered in the billions, along with the disappearance of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, and Heath Hen. These extinctions reveal the fragile connections between species and their environment. 
The Smithsonian Libraries, National Museum of Natural History, and the Biodiversity Heritage Library will be hosting a Twitter Chat on September 2, 2014 from 2-3 pm Eastern Time. This is your chance to ask questions about the Passenger Pigeon, extinction, and biodiversity literature.
Follow @SILibraries, @NMNH, and @BioDivLibrary and use the hashtag #Martha100 to tweet your questions.

smithsonianlibraries:

This is Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon. She died on September 1, 1914 in the Cincinnati Zoo. Shortly thereafter, her body was packed in ice and sent by railroad to Washington, DC, to become a part of the National Museum of Natural History’s collection as a lasting legacy of the harm that can be done to the natural world by humans. Just decades prior, the Passenger Pigeon was the most abundant bird in North America. The disappearance of the species helped ignite the modern conservation movement.

For the Centennial of her death, Martha was recently brought out for display and is currently on view in the exhibition Once There Were Billions, Vanished Birds of North America. Sponsored by the Smithsonian Libraries in partnership with the National Museum of Natural History and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, the exhibition tells the story of the last Passenger Pigeon, a member of a species that once numbered in the billions, along with the disappearance of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, and Heath Hen. These extinctions reveal the fragile connections between species and their environment. 

The Smithsonian Libraries, National Museum of Natural History, and the Biodiversity Heritage Library will be hosting a Twitter Chat on September 2, 2014 from 2-3 pm Eastern Time. This is your chance to ask questions about the Passenger Pigeon, extinction, and biodiversity literature.

Follow @SILibraries, @NMNH, and @BioDivLibrary and use the hashtag #Martha100 to tweet your questions.

magictransistor:

Otto Homburger. Rabanus Maurus, Figure Poems. Four Cardinal Virtues, Four Elements, Twelve Months Zodiac and Winds, 365 Days of the Year, Number 70, Five Books of the Pentateuch, The Name Adam, 276 Days of the Incarnation of Christ, The 5231 Years from the Beginning of Time to the Passion of Christ, Four Evangelists and the Lamb of God (top to bottom). Codice 9, Burgerbibliothek. 11th century.

centuriespast:

Goddess, fully robed and crowned with the battlemented crown, standing and holding in either hand a round-bodied bottle directly under each breast. the background is relieved with rosettes.
Iraq, Ur, Diqdiqqeh
Period: Old Babylonian

Date Made: 2000-1500 BC
Penn Museum

centuriespast:

Goddess, fully robed and crowned with the battlemented crown, standing and holding in either hand a round-bodied bottle directly under each breast. the background is relieved with rosettes.

Iraq, Ur, Diqdiqqeh

Period: Old Babylonian

Date Made: 2000-1500 BC

Penn Museum


Unidentified arm of the Roman (possibly Hadrianic) varietyVatican Museum, Rome

Unidentified arm of the Roman (possibly Hadrianic) variety
Vatican Museum, Rome

(Source: memoirs-of-hadrian)

31

Aug

rmtc-rnr:

RMTC RNR -
LM
VV

rmtc-rnr:

RMTC RNR -

LM

VV

asapscience:

The descent into Alzheimer’s disease. A doctor chronicles the signatures of his patient as the disease took hold of her. Our love goes out to anyone who’s dealt with this awful disease in some way. 
via Reddit

asapscience:

The descent into Alzheimer’s disease. 

A doctor chronicles the signatures of his patient as the disease took hold of her. Our love goes out to anyone who’s dealt with this awful disease in some way. 

via Reddit

30

Aug

nevver:

“Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.”
― Mary Shelley,  Frankenstein     (cover, Maciej Ratajski)

nevver:

“Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.”
― Mary Shelley, Frankenstein   (cover, Maciej Ratajski)

(Source: joshuafountain)

29

Aug

centuriespast:

Stela of King Ka’a of black quartzite inscribed with the Horus name of the King. This stela is decorated with a serekh (a rectangle with paneled lower half) surmounted by an image of the falcon god Horus. The Horus-name was the oldest element of the pharaoh’s titulary and associated him with the falcon god. The two large pieces of this stela were discovered at Abydos during separate excavations of the Early Dynastic royal cemetery. The fragments were reunited at Penn Museum in 1903.
Egypt, Abydos
Locus: Tomb Q (Tomb of King Ka’a, east side, over chamber 3)
Period: Egyptian Early Dynastic
First Dynasty
Date Made: 3000 - 2800 BC
Penn Museum

centuriespast:

Stela of King Ka’a of black quartzite inscribed with the Horus name of the King. This stela is decorated with a serekh (a rectangle with paneled lower half) surmounted by an image of the falcon god Horus. The Horus-name was the oldest element of the pharaoh’s titulary and associated him with the falcon god. The two large pieces of this stela were discovered at Abydos during separate excavations of the Early Dynastic royal cemetery. The fragments were reunited at Penn Museum in 1903.

Egypt, Abydos

Locus: Tomb Q (Tomb of King Ka’a, east side, over chamber 3)

Period: Egyptian Early Dynastic

First Dynasty

Date Made: 3000 - 2800 BC

Penn Museum

28

Aug

appendixjournal:

Millerite chart that uses numerology to claim an imminent apocalypse, 1843. Read more. 

Make things that look like this

appendixjournal:

Millerite chart that uses numerology to claim an imminent apocalypse, 1843. Read more. 

Make things that look like this

25

Aug

Judith Rothchild

Judith Rothchild

21

Aug


Countess De Castiglione

Countess De Castiglione

(Source: inneroptics)

20

Aug

ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.